The Paths To Understanding Podcast

A podcast that looks at various topics through the lens of wisdom traditions. Panel discussions on Challenge 2.0 and Wisdom From Our Neighborhood take different approaches to sharing the stories and expertise of our guests.

Find out more at https://pathstounderstanding.org

Learn more about Paths to Understanding at https://www.PathsToUnderstanding.org
Join the Paths Network at https://www.PathsNetwork.org

Seven years ago, a twenty one year old white man walked into a predominantly black church in South Carolina, opened fire and killed nine members of that faith community.  Most religious communities condemned the action and beliefs of Dylan Roof. But many  have also failed to see the contradiction between their expressed beliefs and their fears, resentments and discomfort focused on people of color. In this episode of Challenge 2.0, we examine Racism; Religion’s Blind Spot…what it’s like to be black in mostly white faith communities. 

Learn more about Paths to Understanding at https://www.PathsToUnderstanding.org
Join the Paths Network at https://www.PathsNetwork.org

In last weeks’ edition of Challenge 2.0, we began a conversation with two prominent atheists/humanists. What do those terms mean? Does their disbelief mean they don’t share common values with those who do profess a religious faith? Is there room for collaborative action and connection in a society that increasingly offers neither?

Terry is joined by Devin Burghart of Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights to discuss countering the right wing populist movement that has coalesced in the last 10 years. Terry and Devin discuss this movement, how it has changed, and what role each of us can play to counter it.

Devin Burghart is president of Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights and coordinates the Seattle office. He has researched, written, and organized on virtually all facets of contemporary white nationalism since 1992, and is internationally recognized for this effort.  Devin is frequently quoted as an expert by the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Los Angeles Times, Philadelphia Enquirer, Arizona Republic, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, The Nation, and Rolling Stone. He has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, the CBS News and National Public Radio, and other broadcast media outlets. 

Learn more about Devin's work at: https://www.irehr.org/

Learn more about Paths to Understanding at https://www.PathsToUnderstanding.org
Join the Paths Network at https://www.PathsNetwork.org

They are children with great needs but little ability to express them. The challenge these children and their families face have often resisted traditional therapies. But a talented recording Seattle artist has developed a program that harnesses the power of music to give these young people a voice and a future that once seemed impossible. That’s the focus of this week’s Challenge 2.0-Singing Away Silence. 

Parenting is never an easy job, but the demands of parenting expanded during the pandemic. It wasn’t confined to teaching or supervising remote schooling. Parents also needed to help guide their children through the murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Brianna Taylor, the increasing gulf between the haves and have nots plus the violent takeover the US Capitol. In this edition of Challenge 2.0, we talk with an education expert, parent of five and the author of a book designed to help parents help their children. 

The death of a teenager from bone cancer seems to be an unlikely source of inspiration. But it led to the establishment of a unique camp that has lifted the spirits of thirty five thousand children and their families; each facing life altering medical conditions. Camp Korey is an inspiring story of compassion, connection and personal transformation; a story that offers lessons even to families who are not facing major medical challenges, but simply seeking to grow together, not apart. 

In last week’s edition of Challenge 2.0, we examined the connection but also the tension between personal rights and personal responsibilities…a tension which has increased during the COVID pandemic. In “No One Tells Me What to Do-Part Two”, we continue this discussion on the implications, the dangers of this tension, and what balance is needed. 

Sixty one million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID as of this date-eight hundred and thirty eight thousand have died. The COVID Pandemic is proof of our interconnection, our interdependence. Yet instead of focusing on how we can meet and beat this threat together, we’re hearing much about personal ‘rights’. That’s the focus of this edition of Challenge 2.0, “No One Tells Me What to Do”.  

When we celebrate holidays such as Christmas or Hanukkah, seasons marked less by personal or collective celebrations of faith and more by gatherings at stores-online or brick and mortar. Is this so much a trend related to a decline in religious faith or a larger question of what our society has come to value? That’s the subject of this weeks’ Challenge 2.0-“In Shopping We Trust”. 

Like it or not, Christmas has become the most commercialized holiday in the U.S. Americans spend over 600 billion dollars on the holiday, compared to 6 billion dollars for Halloween-the second most commercialized holiday. One in five Americans go into debt to finance their gift and decoration purchases. What is lost by the focus on consumer spending? What are alternatives? That’s the focus of this week’s Challenge 2.0.  

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